I Love You in Different Times

The 80s I love you: Party Line Problem
The phone sans the caller ID rang.
I picked it up.
“Hello?” I said.
Silence on the other end of the line.
(says my codename).
I smiled, careful not to let my parents hear that I was talking with him.
“How are you?” he asked.
“I’m good. What about you?” I replied.
“I just thought about you,” he said.
We talked about childhood stuff the way tweens did.
The party-line interrupted us and told us that she would use the phone.
“We have just started talking,” I contested.
“Oh, are you entertaining suitors over the phone?” she dared ask.
It was the late 80s where people were conservative.
“Just give me the line; this is an emergency!” she demanded.
We let her use the line; he promised to call me up later.
After half an hour, I picked up the handset.
The party-line was still talking with her boyfriend.
It was not an emergency!
I interrupted them, “I’m expecting a call.”
“You rude little girl! We’re still talking!” she said.
Rude? I showed them how rude I could get.
I placed the handset beside a loud walkie-talkie.
I heard a woman screaming in anger.
I won.
The phone sans the caller ID rang.
It was him.
We talked again.
I heard my father’s footsteps.
I told him that I needed to hang up.
“I love you,” he said.
I did not respond.

The 90s I love you: The Operator-Assisted Call
“Hello?” I said
“Why did you ignore me this morning at school?” he asked.
“I did not notice you,” I said.
“But you noticed “X,” he replied.
He let out a deep breath.
Then we talked about our Science subject because we both liked it.
“I will be out of town this weekend. What do you want as pasalubong?”
I told him that I was not after the pasalubong.
“Okay, I’ll just buy what my money could buy. I love you.”
“I love you, too,” then I hang up.
The phone rang again.
“What did you just say?” he asked.
“Ah, that’s nothing,” I said.
“No, I heard you said that you love me, too.”
“Brotherly love,” then I hang up with blushing cheeks.

Three years later, the phone sans the caller ID rang.
“Hello,” I said.
The operator said that it was a long-distance call.
I accepted the call, excited about the person on the other end of the line.
“I miss you,” he said.
“I miss you, too,” I said.
We ranted about how long the sem-break seemed to be as first-time lovers normally did.
And as expected, at the end of the long-distance call was this: “Bye for now. Take care and I love you,” he said.
“I can’t hear the last words,” I said.
He shouted the last words and I could just imagine how the other callers from the phone booths reacted.

The 2000s I love you: Age of Shortcuts
Text message.
“Mis u. Luv u,” he said.
“Luv u 2,” I said.

This further evolved into instant messaging two decades later with emojis and .gifs.

I’ve seen, heard, and felt love since the late 80s up to the present times. I notice how saying “I love you” becomes easier now than before. It could be because the emojis allow people to express themselves openly that is why saying “I love you” becomes as normal as saying “Please” or “Thank you.”
Don’t get me wrong, I support expressiveness between lovers, families, and friends. When it comes to people who do not share a deep relationship, I find it odd when they say “I love you” as an expression of approval or agreement.
The changing times allow my thoughts to wander to the days when saying “I love you” was difficult because the recipient would hold on to it and expect that those words and actions would last.

The Crown

The Crown, Queens Don't Chase
The Crown

“Queens don’t chase. That’s how the crown falls.”


I am trying to find the author of this quote but different names popped out. Anyway, this quote sends a powerful message not only to the women out there but also to men. Should a woman accept the size of the crown that her man gives just to please him?


When the crown is too small for the woman’s head, it will fall off. When the crown is too big for the woman’s head, the same thing will happen. Wearing an ill-fitting crown will not only make the queen uncomfortable but it will be prone to accident, as well. Besides, this is the reason why queens don’t chase because that’s how the crown falls.


Of course, I am not talking about the gender superiority complex here. I am talking about reminding couples in a relationship that compatibility plays a big factor in a long- lasting partnership. Most women fall into the trap of finding excuses for their man’s bad behavior. They become the chaser and not the chased. Men take advantage of this and continue with their misbehavior. When the woman starts to behave like a queen with a precious crown on her head, she is more in tune with her feelings and how she should behave.
Of course, there would be some men who would dare challenge women and question what’s the big deal with having an ill-fitting crown? Those men are so selfish, they do not care about offending women. If this type of man has this mindset, the woman must think twice before marrying him. And should a woman has already married this kind of man, she should prioritize her sanity and guard her feelings. Selfish men all care about what is good for them. Sometimes, insecurity triggers their selfishness, and women are not obliged to change how men should behave. Women are obsessed with the idea of being the one to transform men’s behavior and the success rate is small.


The truth is, men will change for the better when they deeply love a woman. The bitter truth is, men don’t care about offending women that they don’t really love and they take pride in getting away with it. A good relationship is for better and for worse. Don’t chase after somebody who is not into you. Believe in action and not by words.

Closure

I guess people see me as somebody trustworthy enough so they don’t feel awkward in sharing their life/love story. Somebody asked me about my opinion on closure. I told her that the moment two people fall apart, that’s closure; no more no less.

Why do we have to romanticize the end of any relationships? It must be the inner struggle to let go of the person and come to terms of accepting that things do really come to an end.

Why do we even bother to know the reasons behind the other person’s change of heart when it’s quite obvious that he/she just fell out of love? It must be the secret hope of winning back the other person and continue whatever is left of the relationship.

More often than not, we cling to the beautiful memories of the past because it feels good to be reminded that once in our life, we were happy with the other person and we wish that that moment will be duplicated. But we fail to recognize that people change, either for the better or for the worse and that we just need to accept if the other person is no longer into us.

Closure is like the ending of a chapter in a book, keeping it in a year and then reading it again to find out that you have a different interpretation of the paragraphs. With another year of closing it and leaving it as is, you become more mature and see the broader scenario instead of confining to what you initially thought the plot is all about. Then comes another year of leaving it as is and then re-reading it until you fully understand that there are paragraphs that are nice on the eyes to read but do not necessarily have an impact on what you currently believe as a person. It’s like a past relationship where you’ll be fascinated to discuss about but not necessarily wish for a second chance.

 

The Good In Good-bye

When I was younger, I used to get hurt over people leaving me. Good-bye was something that I hated. The pain was too much for me to handle. I felt useless.

Somebody from grade school asked me if we could be friends then. I gave her my best but unfortunately, she thought that the friendship was a mismatch. She wrote me a letter to tell me that the friendship was over. I did not cry; I just accepted that maybe, we were really a mismatch.

Two decades later, the friendship was rekindled and I thought that being adults, we could establish a deeper level of friendship this time. I had the best times of my life in her company. Then we got busy with our personal lives and never resumed the friendship. In my heart, I knew it was her second good-bye. I was very hurt the second time she turned her back on me.

She was not the first to say good-bye to me. Include my ex-boyfriend and the people who I thought considered me as part of their life. I was very emotional before about good-byes.

Now that I’m older, I realize that there is actually good in good-bye. If two people can’t connect with each other and only one is willing to compromise, it’s better to say good-bye. Somebody much deserving will be given to replace them.

The good in good-bye is accepting that there’s  nothing we can do to make a person stay and those who stayed deserve our love and loyalty. Don’t cry over those who left. Rejoice over those who stayed.

Season of Split Up

Ouch! That hurts!

Ouch! That hurts!

What do Angel Locsin and Philyounghusband, Miranda Kerr and Orlando Bloom, Jennylyn Mercado and Luis Manzano, Cristine Reyes and Derek Ramsey, Miley Cyrus and Liam Hemsworth, Sheree and Gian Magdangal, LJ Reyes and Paulo Avelino, Sunshine Cruz and Cesar Montano, Claudine Baretto and Raymart Santiago and Nikki Gil and Billy Crawford have in common? Yeah right, these couples are no longer together. What’s with 2013? This year must be a year of split ups.

One day you see these couple acting sweet and the next day, their love for each other is gone. I don’t believe in the “it’s a mutual decision to end our relationship” press release. In the first place, I never believed that love stands on a fulcrum; one of the couple will love more and give more while the other will love less and receive more. In ending a relationship, one will definitely do the first move and the other one will just agree but ending the relationship does not necessarily mean that it is a mutual decision. From the point of view of the initiator, declaring it as a mutual decision will probably ease all guilt feelings while from the receiver’s perspective, it’s like putting on a brave front.

In the case of Paulo and LJ, Orlando and Miranda, Raymart and Claudine and Cesar and Sunshine, the split up becomes complicated when there are children involved. Maybe the separation will not be traumatic to first two pairs’ children mentioned because they seem to be working on being civil with each other but the last two pairs look like they need to raise the white flag, if only for the sake of their offsprings.

Ah, love is really magical. Just when you thought that you have found the right partner and live with him/her, love slips away the moment you realize that there’s nothing really special about your other half. Love is magical and blinding in the sense that you need to dissect it a little deeper for you to take hold of it once more. That is why love is said to be accepting, hence, learning to love a person at his worst.

Love is about loyalty, very simple. There would be a thousand colors in the spectrum but I would always choose celadon green to be my favorite color, yeah, the most special one. The problem with committed couples is, they can’t decide which color to pick on.